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Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: When I look across specs from various manufacturers, I see a wide variety of confusing information. For instance, one manufacturer will claim their 35W fixture is equivalent to a 175W metal-halide fixture. Another seller will claim their 50W is equivalent. Should I go with the higher rated one to guarantee more light?
A: Absolutely not. Wattage ratings is not a guarantee of more lumen output from your LED fixture. Most LED fixtures being offered today consist of an LED driver (like a ballast) and some sort of LED light source (either individual LEDs or a dense LED array. The primary spec to look for is lumens per watt. Many cheap import fixtures use older, less expensive LEDs which have an output that can range from 80 to 100 lumens per watt. On the other hand, the Lumenosity wall pack, canopy, and floodlight fixtures sold by eLEDdirect use LEDs rated at 150 Lumens per watt! The efficiency of the LED can be all of the difference in these "specification wars," and you often find the higher wattage fixtures are not the best choice. Most sites will tell you what the LED fixture is supposed to equal, but sometimes you have to look hard to find it.
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Q: My current Metal-Halide and Florescent fixtures claim to put out thousands of lumens, but LED fixtures are only a fraction of that. Please explain.
A: In general terms, traditional bulbs do put out a lot of light, but that amount is spaced over a 3-dimensional sphere, much like a globe. Bulbs are said to be omni-directional, or rather, they put out light in every direction. When a bulb is in a directional light fixture like a wallpack or floodlight, about 25% of its light escapes the fixture directly. The remaining 75% of the light is bouncing around in the fixture, and only about 10% of this spurious light actually makes it out of the fixture after factoring reflective and surface losses.

On the other hand, LEDs are very directional, not omni-directional like a bulb. They typically emit lumens in a 2-dimensional plane at a 110-120 degree angle. In a fixture, this can lead to nearly ALL of the lumens produced by the LED light engine escaping the light fixture.

Thus, as a general rule of thumb, it only takes 1/3 of the number of lumens from an LED fixture to approximate the equivalent amount of lumens produced by a typical bulb fixture.
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Q: Why is surge protection important in an LED fixture?
A: LED's are solid state electronics, known officially as light-emitting diodes. Large light bulbs are inherently more suited to withstand nearby lighting strikes and their associated transients than any raw solid state equivalent. All fixtures manufactured by Lumenosity such as wallpacks, canopy fixtures, and roadway lighting come with their patented PolyVector surge protection. This includes surge protection on each LED, as well as a multi-tech protection scheme on each light engine.
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Q: Most of your fixtures are offered in 5000k color temperatures. What does this mean?
A: "White" light, as opposed to other colors such as blue, red, and amber is measured on a "Kelvin" scale instead of a wavelength scale. 5000k is the most popular color offered in exterior fixtures such as wallpacks, shoebox, flood light, and canopy fixtures. In general, a fixture can be offered rated from 2800k-3300k and be called "Warm White." This rating is akin to the soft yellow light one finds in incandescent bulbs. The range of 3800k-4300k is called "Neutral White" and is most popular in indoor applications such as LED troffer and LED high bay applications. The range of 5000k-6000K is called "Cool White." When one approaches 5800k-6000k, the light has much more of a "blue" appearance.
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Q: What does Color Rendering Index mean ?
A: Color Rendering Index, or CRI, is a measurement of how well color is reproduced under a light source, with natural sunshine being the baseline of 100. The higher the CRI score, the truer colors will appear. For instance, incandescent bulbs are known for CRI scores as high as 95%, whereas florescent bulbs can be closer to 75. Sodium and Mercury vapor lights are among the worst performers on the CRI scale, falling in the 60-65 range. Typical LED exterior fixtures from Lumenosity such as wall pack, canopy, shoebox, and flood fixtures use LEDs that are typically in the 80-85 CRI range. Interior fixtures such as LED troffer, retrofit, and high bay fixtures are closer to the 90 CRI range.
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